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Current U.S. Student

United States citizens who are currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs are eligible to apply. All applicants enrolled in U.S institutions must apply through their home campuses. Find the Fulbright Program Adviser on your campus.

If you are an undergraduate student, you are eligible to apply in the fall of your senior year.  If you are a graduate student, you are eligible as long as you will not have a PhD degree by the application deadline.

U.S. Citizen but not a Student

If you are a U.S. citizen, will hold a bachelor’s degree by the award start date, and do not have a PhD degree, then you are eligible to apply. Non-enrolled applicant should have relatively limited professional experience in the fields (typically 7 years or less) in which they are applying. Candidates with more experience should consider applying for the Fulbright Scholar Program.

The Getting Started page will provide information on eligibility and next steps.

Artist

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program welcomes applications in the creative and performing arts. Arts candidates for the U.S. Student Program should have relatively limited professional experience in the fields (typically 7 years or less) in which they are applying. Artists with more experience should consider applying for the Fulbright Scholar Program.

Creative & Performing Arts projects fall under the Study/Research grant category and are available in all countries where Study/Research grants are offered. 

FPA

U.S. Professor/Administrator

If you are a U.S. citizen and a professor or administrator at a U.S. institution and are interested in applying for a Fulbright Scholar Award, you will need to apply through CIES.

To support your students in applying for a U.S. Student Program award, please connect with the Fulbright Program Adviser at your institution.

Non U.S. Citizens

If you are a non-U.S. citizen interested in applying for a Fulbright Award to the United States, you will need to apply through the Fulbright Commission or U.S. Embassy in your home country. Find out more information on the Fulbright Visiting Scholar or Student Program.

South Korea

Select award for detailed information
stdClass Object ( [id] => 39 [country_id] => 66 [grant_type_id] => 8 [number_of_grants] => 13 [title] => Open Study/Research Award [content] => {"fields":[{"name":"Specialized Grant Types","id":"specialized_grant_types","type":"options","visibility":2,"value":[]},{"name":"Fulbright Graduate Degree Grants","id":"fulbright_graduate_degree_grants","type":"checkbox","visibility":2,"value":false},{"name":"CLEA Availability","id":"clea_availability","type":"checkbox","visibility":2,"value":false},{"name":"Award Profile","id":"award_profile","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

Open Study/Research Awards provide the opportunity for academically mature students to complete independent research projects in Korea through 10 months of grant support. Student researchers are sought in all academic fields and from all degree levels (Bachelor's, Master's, and Doctoral), with the broad requirement that student researchers must pursue a distinctive research project relevant to Korea that can be reasonably accomplished within the Open Study/Research Award's 10-month time frame.  

"},{"name":"Grant Period","id":"grant_period","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"August Start","value":"

Grants will start on August 22, 2022, and end on June 21, 2023 (dates to be confirmed).

\n

Alternate start dates will not be considered, except under the most extraordinary circumstances.

"}},{"name":"Orientation","id":"orientation","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Pre-Departure and In-Country Orientation","value":"

A virtual pre-departure orientation session will be offered by the Commission during the spring/summer of 2022 prior to grantee arrival in Korea.

"}},{"name":"Candidate Profile","id":"candidate_profile","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

Applicants at all degree levels will be considered. Ideal applicants should propose a distinctive research project relevant to Korea that can be reasonably accomplished in 10 months. Applicants possessing appropriate language facility and previous cross-cultural experience will find their research more effectively accomplished and their Fulbright experience enhanced. Applicants whose research projects illustrate a specific knowledge of Korean and/or East Asian history, politics, culture, or religions, for example, will have a better grasp of research possibilities. Applicants must clearly articulate their future plans and express a compelling reason for coming to Korea for their research, as opposed to any other country. Applicants must also clearly specify the wider impact of their project and how it will enhance the relationship between the two countries.

\n

Due to the hands-off nature of independent research in Korea, undergraduates/recent graduates proposing independent research must have the academic maturity, rigor, and depth of knowledge to work independently without close guidance from their host supervisor. They must exhibit a high level of subject knowledge and personal/academic initiative. Applicants must also articulate a clear plan and outcome for their research. It is still important that grantees have strong project support from their host institution and supervisor.

"},{"name":"Accepted Degree Levels","id":"accepted_degree_levels","type":"options","visibility":1,"value":["Bachelor's","Master's","Doctoral"]},{"name":"Supplementary Project","id":"supplementary_project","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"","value":""}},{"name":"Foreign Language Proficiency","id":"foreign_language_proficiency","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Required - Novice","value":"

Additional Information: Korean language proficiency is strongly recommended, not only for the development of the proposed project, but also in order to settle in easily and communicate on a daily basis. Higher level proficiency may be necessary depending on the requirements of the proposed project. The use of translators to conduct research under Fulbright is discouraged.

\n

All applicants must show evidence of having language proficiency commensurate with the requirements of the proposed project. In the Fulbright online application, applicants must include a Language Self-Evaluation and a Foreign Language Evaluation by a professional language instructor in relation to their language proficiency.

"}},{"name":"Critical Language Enhancement Award","id":"critical_language_enhancement_award","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":""},{"name":"Fulbright Proposal Types","id":"fulbright_proposal_types","type":"options_array","visibility":1,"value":[{"name":"Independent Study/Research","id":"isr","value":"Yes"},{"name":"Graduate Degree Enrollment","id":"gde","value":"No"}]},{"name":"Affiliation","id":"affiliation","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Letter required for independent research at deadline","value":"

The role of the affiliation in the U.S. Student Program is to provide ongoing and substantive oversight and support to the grantee's project. Grantees will be required to have an affiliation with an appropriate host institution in Korea, such as a college, university, research center, or cultural institute. Applicants must initiate contact with the host institution of preference and obtain a formal letter of affiliation between the applicant and the host institution. The letter should state that a host supervisor will be available during the grant year to mentor the applicant and/or supervise the applicant's work on the proposed project. While issuing the letter, the host supervisor must address accurately the following points:

\n
    \n
  1. Origin of the collaboration;
  2. \n
  3. Role of the host supervisor in the applicant project;
  4. \n
  5. Plans by the host affiliation to involve the applicant in the institution's activities;
  6. \n
  7. Access to facilities and resources;
  8. \n
  9. Collaboration with an ongoing project. 
  10. \n
\n

Although not required, if affiliated with a higher education institution, applicants are encouraged to discuss with their affiliation the possibility of auditing courses for the purpose of enhancing their Fulbright experience and research.

"}},{"name":"Affiliation Fees/Tuition","id":"affiliation_fees","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Tuition not covered in grant benefits","value":""}},{"name":"Housing Arrangements","id":"housing_arrangements","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":""},{"name":"Placement Type","id":"placement_type","type":"multitype","visibility":1,"value":[{"type":"options","value":[]},{"type":"text","value":""}]},{"name":"Eligibility","id":"eligibility","type":"multitype","visibility":1,"value":[{"type":"options_array","value":[{"name":"","id":"f_eligibility_01","value":"Dual citizens of this country are not eligible"},{"name":"","id":"f_eligibility_02","value":"Residency in host country not permitted in year prior to grant"}]},{"type":"text","value":"
    \n
  • Candidates with dual U.S.-Republic of Korea nationality/citizenship will not be considered. (See section on Visa Requirements/Dual Nationality below.)
  • \n
  • Candidates currently residing in Korea (or those who will be living there during the 2021-2022 academic year) will not be considered.  
  • \n
  • Candidates who have already received a PhD degree by the grant start date are not eligible for consideration.
  • \n
"}]},{"name":"Special Application Instructions","id":"special_application_instructions","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

As part of the selection process, semi-finalist candidates who are recommended for final review by the Fulbright Commission in Korea (KAEC) may be contacted for interviews via video call or phone. An invitation to an interview is a further step in the selection process and not a guarantee that the semi-finalist will be selected for a grant in Korea.

"},{"name":"Custom Fields","id":"custom_fields","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"Institutional Review Board (IRB) Clearance","value":"

For all levels and types of projects, if the proposed research project entails \"human subject\" issues, candidates should be aware that gaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval after arrival in Korea is difficult, time-consuming, and, in some cases, not possible. As such, applicants should discuss this issue with their host supervisor well in advance of their arrival in Korea and explore obtaining IRB approval from their current university if at all possible.

"},{"name":"Visa Requirements/Dual Nationality","value":"

Note: The Korean Government utilizes the words “national/nationality” as opposed to “citizen/citizenship” in most official documentation in English. These words can be viewed as interchangeable for the purposes of this advisory.

\n

All Fulbright U.S. Program grantees coming to Korea MUST obtain an A-3 visa and enter the country on a U.S. passport. No other visa status will be accepted.

\n

Candidates who are nationals of Korea will NOT be permitted to undertake Fulbright grants to Korea. 

\n

Individuals of Korean heritage may have dual U.S.-ROK nationality unbeknownst to them or their family.

\n

In April 2010, the Republic of Korea passed legislation that allows dual nationality, with differing rules for men and women. If one of an applicant’s parents is or was a Korean national, the applicant may automatically inherit Korean nationality via Korea’s “jus sanguinis” laws. In order to confirm their Korean nationality status, applicants of Korean heritage MUST contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Korean Consulate PRIOR TO submitting a Fulbright application.

\n

Applicants in the following circumstances are considered by the Republic of Korea to be Korean nationals:

\n
    \n
  • An individual whose father or mother was still a Korean national at the time of the individual’s birth.
  • \n
  • An individual whose father was a Korean national and was deceased at the time of the individual’s birth.
  • \n
\n

Applicants who fall under either of the categories listed above must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Korean Consulate immediately to learn more about these regulations and the suggested procedures for filing for renunciation/loss of Korean nationality.

\n

Applicants who were born in Korea and received American citizenship through naturalization should have lost their Korean nationality automatically at the time of their naturalization. However, official renunciation documentation (국적상실신고) must still be submitted to the Korean Government in order to formalize a citizenship status change. Per the Korean Consulate in Houston, “Failure to formally renounce one’s citizenship after being naturalized in another country may cause issues when applying for visas, marriage or birth registry, and legal matters.” As such, those from Korea naturalized as American citizens must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate to ensure that their loss of Korean nationality has been formally recognized.

\n

Applicants who were born in Korea and received American citizenship through adoption should have lost their Korean nationality automatically six months after American citizenship was granted. However, it has come to KAEC’s attention that Korean nationality renunciation has not always been finalized for adoptees. As such, those adopted from Korea also must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate prior to submitting a Fulbright application to confirm their Korean nationality status.

\n

It is the sole responsibility of the applicant to determine whether they have dual nationality and how it impacts their eligibility for a Fulbright grant. If any individual is found to have dual nationality with Korea at the time of or after grant acceptance, their award offer will be revoked.

\n

In order to avoid cancellation of a Fulbright grant, KAEC requires that all American applicants of Korean heritage provide written proof that they do not have Korean nationality before they accept their grant award. This can be accomplished in two ways, which are listed as follows:

\n
    \n
  1. Submit written proof from the ROK Ministry of Justice declaring that the applicant does not have Korean nationality.\n
      \n
    • Such written proof may take the form of the “basic certificate” (기본증명서), “family relations/register certificate” (가족관계증명서), etc. Documentation must clearly indicate that the applicant does not have Korean nationality in order for it to be accepted as written proof.
    • \n
    \n
  2. \n
  3. Submit a formal document from the ROK Ministry of Justice declaring that the applicant has successfully renounced/lost their Korean nationality.\n
      \n
    • Such documentation may take the form of a “loss of nationality notice” (국적상실 허가 통지서), “renunciation of nationality notice” (국적이탈 허가 통지서), etc.
    • \n
    \n
  4. \n
\n

As an individual’s Korean nationality status is contingent upon specific personal and family history, all applicants of Korean heritage should contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate as early as possible once they have established their interest in the Fulbright Program in Korea in order to confirm their Korean nationality status and acquire appropriate documentation.

\n

More information about Korean nationality law can be found at:

\n"}]},{"name":"Dependents","id":"dependents","type":"options","value":["Dependent support is available"]},{"name":"Placement Locations","id":"placement_locations","type":"multitype","value":[{"type":"options","value":[]},{"type":"text","value":""}]},{"name":"Fulbright Program Management Contact","id":"pm_contact","type":"text","value":"FBstudent.EAP@iie.org"},{"name":"Fulbright Commission/U.S. Embassy Website","id":"embassy_website","type":"link","value":"http://www.fulbright.or.kr"},{"name":"Fulbright Commission/U.S. Embassy Contact","id":"embassy_contact","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"Namhyeong Kim","value":"grant@fulbright.or.kr "}]},{"name":"Additional Online Resources","id":"resources","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"ROK Embassies and Consulates in the USA ","value":"http://overseas.mofa.go.kr/us-en/index.do"},{"name":"US Embassy and Consulate in South Korea ","value":"https://kr.usembassy.gov/"},{"name":"State Department Country Information ","value":"https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/International-Travel-Country-Information-Pages/SouthKorea.html"}]},{"name":"Is new for this year","id":"is_new","type":"checkbox","value":false}]} [is_new] => 0 [step] => 6 [status] => 1 [updated_on] => 2021-03-29 13:37:34 [finalized_date] => 2019-03-22 11:20:13 [countryName] => South Korea [regionId] => 20 [countryCode] => KR [countryAlias] => south-korea [regionName] => East Asia-Pacific [regionAlias] => east-asia-pacific [regionColor] => #c16339 [regionPosition] => a:3:{i:0;d:2.2;i:1;i:110;i:2;d:4.25;} [regionBgColor] => #ff8200 [regionBgHoverColor] => #dc4405 )
13
Open Study/Research Award
stdClass Object ( [id] => 256 [country_id] => 66 [grant_type_id] => 2 [number_of_grants] => 60 [title] => English Teaching Assistant Award - Secondary [content] => {"fields":[{"name":"Specialized Grant Types","id":"specialized_grant_types","type":"options","visibility":2,"value":[]},{"name":"Fulbright Graduate Degree Grants","id":"fulbright_graduate_degree_grants","type":"checkbox","visibility":2,"value":false},{"name":"CLEA Availability","id":"clea_availability","type":"checkbox","visibility":2,"value":false},{"name":"Award Profile","id":"award_profile","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

First and foremost, ETAs should understand that the nature of the grant is a full-time teaching job and their duty is first to their school.

\n

Time Commitment: ETAs should expect to spend up to 22 hours per week teaching classes. Other hours of the school day can be for class preparation and school-related activities. School hours can vary greatly depending on the school’s goals for the ETA, number of students, and placement.

\n

Co-Teaching/Independent Teaching: Individuals applying to work in a secondary school should be prepared to plan their own lessons and conduct class by themselves. Co-teaching and/or independent teaching situations will vary greatly. They depend on the school's situation and the ETA's background and qualifications from school to school. Some co-teaching situations will consist of co-teachers who only translate, others may consist of co-teachers who actively plan and lead the class together with the ETA. 

\n

Other Possible Teaching Responsibilities: Consulting with teachers on American cultural issues, assisting in the editing or writing of educational materials for English teaching, conducting language evaluations, English camps and English club classes.

\n

Number of Schools: ETAs may be assigned more than one school based on need, but cumulative teaching responsibilities shall not exceed 22 hours per week.

"},{"name":"Grant Period","id":"grant_period","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"January Start","value":"

The grant runs from early January 2023 until mid-December 2023.

\n

Upon receipt of the Fulbright award, all English Teaching Assistants (ETAs) will be expected to complete a 120-hour TESOL/TEFL course designated by the Korean Fulbright Commission (KAEC). ETAs will begin their grants in January 2023 with a six-week orientation program, which will consist of intensive Korean language study, training in ESL teaching techniques, and an overview of Korean culture and history. Renewals for up to two additional years are available and are awarded based upon satisfactory cultural adjustment and teaching performance.

\n

Note on authorized leave time: An accepted grantee's first responsibility is to the Korean host school. There will be a period in the summer when the ETA will have vacation time. Grantees will receive 12 total working days of vacation during the summer break. They will not be allowed to leave the grant early for grad school or other job opportunities.    

\n

*Candidates must be aware that aside from the summer break period, they will not be permitted to travel outside the host country. Individuals should not apply for or accept this award unless they are able to commit to this academic schedule.

"}},{"name":"Orientation","id":"orientation","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"In-Country Orientation","value":""}},{"name":"Candidate Profile","id":"candidate_profile","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

Applicants should be well-rounded graduating seniors or recent graduates under 30 years of age. 

\n

Candidates must be fluent English speakers and demonstrate the necessary initiative to teach conversational English to middle and high school students. Moreover, candidates must give evidence of the ability to adapt and thrive in a variety of intensive cultural environments, such as living in a Korean homestay or a Korean “one-room” apartment alone in the local community and working within the Korean educational system.

\n

Awardees who successfully complete their awards and renew for the second year have the option to live independently in a Korean one-room apartment.

\n

Previous teaching experience (particularly those with a background in secondary education) is preferred, but not required. ETAs cannot be accompanied by dependents.

\n

Applicants must have received an acceptable degree before the start of the grant year. Applicants who will be in the middle of a degree program while on the ETA grant will not be selected. 

"},{"name":"Accepted Degree Levels","id":"accepted_degree_levels","type":"options","visibility":1,"value":["Bachelor's","Master's"]},{"name":"Supplementary Project","id":"supplementary_project","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Not Permitted","value":""}},{"name":"Foreign Language Proficiency","id":"foreign_language_proficiency","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Recommended - Novice","value":"

No Korean language skills are required. However, as the ETA Orientation includes an approximately 100-hour intensive Korean language component, some elementary self-study is expected prior to arrival. While ETAs teach classes in English, a commitment to Korean language learning before and during the grant greatly enhances an ETA’s quality of life in Korea and elevates their interactions with local community members.

"}},{"name":"Critical Language Enhancement Award","id":"critical_language_enhancement_award","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":""},{"name":"Fulbright Proposal Types","id":"fulbright_proposal_types","type":"options_array","visibility":1,"value":[{"name":"Independent Study/Research","id":"isr","value":"n/a"},{"name":"Graduate Degree Enrollment","id":"gde","value":"n/a"}]},{"name":"Affiliation","id":"affiliation","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"","value":""}},{"name":"Affiliation Fees/Tuition","id":"affiliation_fees","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"","value":""}},{"name":"Housing Arrangements","id":"housing_arrangements","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

Participating schools will make housing arrangements. KAEC will make every effort to ensure that host schools find appropriate housing for first-year grantees.

\n

Changes to the Mandatory Homestay Program: Difficulties in securing homestays in recent years have changed the homestay requirement for first-year ETA grantees. KAEC and the host school will do their best to house you in a homestay, but, it is not guaranteed that it will be provided.

\n

MOST ETAs will live in a Korean homestay for a full year.

\n

SOME ETAs will live in a Korean one-room apartment for a full year.

\n

Applicants must be open to being placed in either housing situation. Individuals should not apply for or accept this award if they are not prepared for both the challenges of an immersive experience in a Korean homestay and those that arise from living in a foreign country alone.

"},{"name":"Placement Type","id":"placement_type","type":"multitype","visibility":1,"value":[{"type":"options","value":["Secondary School"]},{"type":"text","value":"

Secondary Schools in Korea are Middle and High Schools (Grades 7-12). Middle and High schools in Korea are separated Grades 7-9 (Middle School) and Grades 10-12 (High School). 

\n

Fulbright grantees' preferences for placement location, school type, and other details will be considered. However, individuals should not apply for or accept this award unless they are committed to teaching in a placement that may differ from their preferences.

"}]},{"name":"Eligibility","id":"eligibility","type":"multitype","visibility":1,"value":[{"type":"options_array","value":[{"name":"","id":"f_eligibility_01","value":"Dual citizens of this country are not eligible"},{"name":"","id":"f_eligibility_02","value":"Residency in host country not permitted in year prior to grant"}]},{"type":"text","value":"
    \n
  • Candidates with dual U.S.-Republic of Korea nationality/citizenship will not be considered. (See section on Visa Requirements/Dual Nationality below.)
  • \n
  • Candidates currently residing in Korea (or those who will be living there during the 2021-2022 academic year) will not be considered.  
  • \n
  • Candidates who have already received a PhD degree by the grant start date are not eligible for consideration.
  • \n
"}]},{"name":"Special Application Instructions","id":"special_application_instructions","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

In your Fulbright online application, for Award Name, please select the specific award you are applying for from the drop-down menu. Depending on school availability, ETA awardees may be at a school different from their preferred demographic. ETA applicants should not apply if they are unable to work in a demographic different from their preference. 

\n

All ETA awardees MUST pay for and receive an apostilled FBI criminal background check before arrival. Criminal background checks are a requirement of employment in schools in Korea.

"},{"name":"Custom Fields","id":"custom_fields","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"Independent Study/Research","value":"

No research or independent study is required. ETA awards are not study/research awards, and teaching takes up most of the grantee's time. In applying, the Statement of Grant Purpose should focus on why the applicant wishes to teach English in Korea, how being an ETA has some relevance to what they have done so far, what they would like to do in the future, and how to make it a memorable cultural experience. Applicants should understand that they will have little time for intensive internships or volunteer opportunities during the school year; in most cases, any long-standing interests in avenues not related to teaching will need to be partaken of during the summer break or after the grant year has ended.

"},{"name":"TESOL/TEFL Certification","value":"

For the 2022-2023 Grant Cycle, KAEC will pay for TESOL/TEFL certification.

\n

All grantees will take an online 120-hour TESOL/TEFL course prior to arriving in Korea in early January in order to meet the Korean government’s requirement. Those already holding certificates/degrees are encouraged to apply and are not required to take the mandated certification course. The Fulbright Commission in Korea will provide TESOL/TEFL certification and coordinate the course logistics after grant acceptance.

"},{"name":"Visa Requirements/Dual Nationality","value":"

Note: The Korean Government utilizes the words “national/nationality” as opposed to “citizen/citizenship” in most official documentation in English. These words can be viewed as interchangeable for the purposes of this advisory.

\n

All Fulbright U.S. Program grantees coming to Korea MUST obtain an A-3 visa and enter the country on a U.S. passport. No other visa status will be accepted.

\n

Candidates who are nationals of Korea will NOT be permitted to undertake Fulbright grants to Korea. 

\n

Individuals of Korean heritage may have dual U.S.-ROK nationality unbeknownst to them or their family.

\n

In April 2010, the Republic of Korea passed legislation that allows dual nationality, with differing rules for men and women. If one of an applicant’s parents is or was a Korean national, the applicant may automatically inherit Korean nationality via Korea’s “jus sanguinis” laws. In order to confirm their Korean nationality status, applicants of Korean heritage MUST contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Korean Consulate PRIOR TO submitting a Fulbright application.

\n

Applicants in the following circumstances are considered by the Republic of Korea to be Korean nationals:

\n
    \n
  • An individual whose father or mother was still a Korean national at the time of the individual’s birth.
  • \n
  • An individual whose father was a Korean national and was deceased at the time of the individual’s birth.
  • \n
\n

Applicants who fall under either of the categories listed above must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Korean Consulate immediately to learn more about these regulations and the suggested procedures for filing for renunciation/loss of Korean nationality.

\n

Applicants who were born in Korea and received American citizenship through naturalization should have lost their Korean nationality automatically at the time of their naturalization. However, official renunciation documentation (국적상실신고) must still be submitted to the Korean Government in order to formalize a citizenship status change. Per the Korean Consulate in Houston, “Failure to formally renounce one’s citizenship after being naturalized in another country may cause issues when applying for visas, marriage or birth registry, and legal matters.” As such, those from Korea naturalized as American citizens must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate to ensure that their loss of Korean nationality has been formally recognized.

\n

Applicants who were born in Korea and received American citizenship through adoption should have lost their Korean nationality automatically six months after American citizenship was granted. However, it has come to KAEC’s attention that Korean nationality renunciation has not always been finalized for adoptees. As such, those adopted from Korea also must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate prior to submitting a Fulbright application to confirm their Korean nationality status.

\n

It is the sole responsibility of the applicant to determine whether they have dual nationality and how it impacts their eligibility for a Fulbright grant. If any individual is found to have dual nationality with Korea at the time of or after grant acceptance, their award offer will be revoked.

\n

In order to avoid cancellation of a Fulbright grant, KAEC requires that all American applicants of Korean heritage provide written proof that they do not have Korean nationality before they accept their grant award. This can be accomplished in two ways, which are listed as follows:

\n
    \n
  1. Submit written proof from the ROK Ministry of Justice declaring that the applicant does not have Korean nationality.\n
      \n
    • Such written proof may take the form of the “basic certificate” (기본증명서), “family relations/register certificate” (가족관계증명서), etc. Documentation must clearly indicate that the applicant does not have Korean nationality in order for it to be accepted as written proof.
    • \n
    \n
  2. \n
  3. Submit a formal document from the ROK Ministry of Justice declaring that the applicant has successfully renounced/lost their Korean nationality.\n
      \n
    • Such documentation may take the form of a “loss of nationality notice” (국적상실 허가 통지서), “renunciation of nationality notice” (국적이탈 허가 통지서), etc.
    • \n
    \n
  4. \n
\n

As an individual’s Korean nationality status is contingent upon specific personal and family history, all applicants of Korean heritage should contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate as early as possible once they have established their interest in the Fulbright Program in Korea in order to confirm their Korean nationality status and acquire appropriate documentation.

\n

More information about Korean nationality law can be found at:

\n"},{"name":"Health Disclosure and Eligibility","value":"

In compliance with the Korean Ministry of Education regulations regarding health and assignment in the school system, candidates must include any medical disclosures for the applicable medical conditions listed below in the medical examination forms provided by IIE and KAEC after being selected as Fulbright finalists. Strict adherence to these regulations is mandatory, and your grant is contingent on the ability to secure a school placement in South Korea. Any attempts to omit or falsify information are immediate grounds for suspending/revoking/terminating the grant. 

\n

Individuals with the following conditions cannot be placed in Korean classrooms:

\n
    \n
  • Visual impairments (conditions that cannot be corrected by glasses/contact lenses)
  • \n
  • Hearing impairments above 40dB
  • \n
\n

In addition, selectees must also disclose the following conditions in their medical forms: 

\n
    \n
  1. Conditions worsened by stress such as: epilepsy, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, etc.
  2. \n
  3. Severe food allergies including, but not limited to: nuts, shellfish, and beans
  4. \n
\n

All teachers in Korea must undergo routine drug testing and medical health checks before and during employment. As such, ETAs must also pay for and receive a drug test and undergo a health check before they are allowed to come to Korea. They must submit all examination results, including tuberculosis testing results, on the Fulbright medical form. This testing is REQUIRED for all candidates who are awarded grants.

\n

A few grantees may be required by their local Board of Education or school to undergo a second health check in Korea to ensure that the ETA’s health is up to the local health employment standards. Regardless, all applicants who accept an ETA grant must undergo a health exam and drug test in the USA before departing for Korea.

\n

Additional Note on Prescription Medication: Applicants with ongoing medical or health issues that need specific prescription medication should keep in mind that while Korea is an advanced country with world-renowned medical facilities, ETAs may be placed in rural settings where access to large medical centers or specific medications is not as prevalent.

\n

Certain prescription drugs are considered controlled substances and subject to the regulations established by the Korean Food and Drug Administration and the Korean Customs Service. While most medication in the USA can be found in Korea, some medication that is available in the USA is not approved in Korea. Applicants who anticipate needing to manage a condition with certain medications should consult their doctor and make informed decisions before applying for or accepting a grant.

\n

Applicants who need prescription medication should also consult the US Embassy in Seoul’s American Citizen’s Service webpage regarding medical assistance AND the Republic of Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (KFDA).

"}]},{"name":"Dependents","id":"dependents","type":"options","value":["Dependent support is not available"]},{"name":"Placement Locations","id":"placement_locations","type":"multitype","value":[{"type":"options","value":["Rural"]},{"type":"text","value":"

In addition, ETAs also will be placed in regional cities.

\n

Applicants should not expect to be placed in or around major metropolitan areas; first-year ETA grantees will not be placed in Seoul. ETAs should be open to teaching at any placement with the understanding that the Fulbright Korea program wishes to reach more underserved populations outside of metropolitan areas.

"}]},{"name":"Fulbright Program Management Contact","id":"pm_contact","type":"text","value":"FBstudent.EAP@iie.org"},{"name":"Fulbright Commission/U.S. Embassy Website","id":"embassy_website","type":"link","value":"http://www.fulbright.or.kr"},{"name":"Fulbright Commission/U.S. Embassy Contact","id":"embassy_contact","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"Isabel Moua","value":"eta@fulbright.or.kr "}]},{"name":"Additional Online Resources","id":"resources","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"ROK Embassies and Consulates in the USA ","value":"http://overseas.mofa.go.kr/us-en/index.do"},{"name":"US Embassy and Consulate in South Korea ","value":"https://kr.usembassy.gov/"},{"name":"US State Department Country Travel Information ","value":"https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/International-Travel-Country-Information-Pages/SouthKorea.html"}]},{"name":"Is new for this year","id":"is_new","type":"checkbox","value":false}]} [is_new] => 0 [step] => 6 [status] => 1 [updated_on] => 2021-05-03 15:54:10 [finalized_date] => 2019-03-22 11:20:13 [countryName] => South Korea [regionId] => 20 [countryCode] => KR [countryAlias] => south-korea [regionName] => East Asia-Pacific [regionAlias] => east-asia-pacific [regionColor] => #c16339 [regionPosition] => a:3:{i:0;d:2.2;i:1;i:110;i:2;d:4.25;} [regionBgColor] => #ff8200 [regionBgHoverColor] => #dc4405 )
60
English Teaching Assistant Award - Secondary
stdClass Object ( [id] => 379 [country_id] => 66 [grant_type_id] => 2 [number_of_grants] => 20 [title] => English Teaching Assistant Award - Elementary [content] => {"fields":[{"name":"Specialized Grant Types","id":"specialized_grant_types","type":"options","visibility":2,"value":[]},{"name":"Fulbright Graduate Degree Grants","id":"fulbright_graduate_degree_grants","type":"checkbox","visibility":2,"value":false},{"name":"CLEA Availability","id":"clea_availability","type":"checkbox","visibility":2,"value":false},{"name":"Award Profile","id":"award_profile","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

First and foremost, ETAs should understand that the nature of the grant is a full-time teaching job and their duty is first to their school.

\n

Time Commitment: ETAs should expect to spend up to 22 hours per week teaching classes. Other hours of the school day can be for class preparation and school-related activities. School hours can vary greatly depending on the school’s goals for the ETA, the number of students, and placement.

\n

Co-Teaching/Independent Teaching: Individuals applying to work in a secondary school should be prepared to plan their own lessons and conduct class by themselves. Co-teaching and/or independent teaching situations vary greatly. They depend on the school's situation and the ETA's background and qualifications from school to school. Some co-teaching situations will consist of co-teachers who only translate, others may consist of co-teachers who actively plan and lead the class together with the ETA.

\n

Other Possible Teaching Responsibilities: consulting with teachers on American cultural issues, assisting in the editing or writing of educational materials for English teaching, conducting language evaluations, English camps and English club classes

\n

Number of Schools: ETAs may be assigned more than one school based on need, but cumulative teaching responsibilities shall not exceed 22 hours per week.

"},{"name":"Grant Period","id":"grant_period","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"January Start","value":"

The grant runs from early January 2023 until mid-December 2023.

\n

Upon receipt of the Fulbright award, all English Teaching Assistants (ETAs) will be expected to complete a 120-hour TESOL/TEFL course designated by the Korean Fulbright Commission (KAEC). ETAs will begin their grants in January 2023 with a six-week orientation program, which will consist of intensive Korean language study, training in ESL teaching techniques, and an overview of Korean culture and history. Renewals for up to two additional years are available and are awarded based upon satisfactory cultural adjustment and teaching performance.

\n

Note on authorized leave time: An accepted grantee's first responsibility is to the Korean host school. There will be a period in the summer when the ETA will have vacation time. Grantees will receive 12 total working days of vacation during the summer break. They will not be allowed to leave the grant early for grad school or other job opportunities.    

\n

*Candidates must be aware that aside from the summer break period, they will not be permitted to travel outside the host country. Individuals should not apply for or accept this award unless they are able to commit to this academic schedule.

"}},{"name":"Orientation","id":"orientation","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"In-Country Orientation","value":""}},{"name":"Candidate Profile","id":"candidate_profile","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

Applicants should be well-rounded graduating seniors or recent graduates under 30 years of age. Applicants must have received an acceptable degree before the start of the grant year. Applicants who will be in the middle of a degree program while on the ETA grant will not be considered. 

\n

Candidates must be fluent English speakers and demonstrate the necessary initiative to teach conversational English to elementary school students. Moreover, candidates must give evidence of the ability to adapt and thrive in a variety of intensive cultural environments, such as living in a Korean homestay or a Korean “one-room” apartment alone in the local community and working within the Korean educational system.

\n

Awardees who successfully complete their awards and renew for the second year have the option to live independently in a Korean one-room apartment.

\n

Education majors (particularly those with a background in early childhood education) are encouraged to apply, but applicants from all majors will be considered. Non-education major ETAs should clearly demonstrate teaching abilities and the ability to interact well with children. They should also explain how their experience as an ETA applies to their future goals. ETAs cannot be accompanied by dependents.

"},{"name":"Accepted Degree Levels","id":"accepted_degree_levels","type":"options","visibility":1,"value":["Bachelor's","Master's"]},{"name":"Supplementary Project","id":"supplementary_project","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Not Permitted","value":""}},{"name":"Foreign Language Proficiency","id":"foreign_language_proficiency","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Recommended - Novice","value":"

No Korean language skills are required. However, as the ETA Orientation includes an approximately 100-hour intensive Korean language component, some elementary self-study is expected prior to arrival. While ETAs teach classes in English, a commitment to Korean language learning before and during the grant greatly enhances an ETA’s quality of life in Korea and elevates their interactions with local community members. 

"}},{"name":"Critical Language Enhancement Award","id":"critical_language_enhancement_award","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":""},{"name":"Fulbright Proposal Types","id":"fulbright_proposal_types","type":"options_array","visibility":1,"value":[{"name":"Independent Study/Research","id":"isr","value":""},{"name":"Graduate Degree Enrollment","id":"gde","value":""}]},{"name":"Affiliation","id":"affiliation","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"","value":""}},{"name":"Affiliation Fees/Tuition","id":"affiliation_fees","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"","value":""}},{"name":"Housing Arrangements","id":"housing_arrangements","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

Participating schools will make housing arrangements. KAEC will make every effort to ensure that host schools find appropriate housing for first-year grantees.

\n

Changes to the Mandatory Homestay Program: Difficulties in securing homestays in recent years have changed the homestay requirement for first-year ETA grantees. KAEC and the host school will do their best to house you in a homestay, but, it is not guaranteed that it will be provided.

\n

MOST ETAs will live in a Korean homestay for a full year.

\n

SOME ETAs will live in a Korean one-room apartment for a full year.

\n

Applicants must be open to being placed in either housing situation. Individuals should not apply for or accept this award if they are not prepared for both the challenges of an immersive experience in a Korean homestay and those that arise from living in a foreign country alone.

"},{"name":"Placement Type","id":"placement_type","type":"multitype","visibility":1,"value":[{"type":"options","value":["Elementary School"]},{"type":"text","value":"

ETAs will primarily teach grades 3-6.

\n

Fulbright grantees' preferences for placement location, school type, and other details will be considered. However, all final decisions regarding ETA placements are made at the discretion of the Commission.

"}]},{"name":"Eligibility","id":"eligibility","type":"multitype","visibility":1,"value":[{"type":"options_array","value":[{"name":"","id":"f_eligibility_01","value":"Dual citizens of this country are not eligible"},{"name":"","id":"f_eligibility_02","value":"Residency in host country not permitted in year prior to grant"}]},{"type":"text","value":"
    \n
  • Candidates with dual U.S.-Republic of Korea nationality/citizenship will not be considered. (See section on Visa Requirements/Dual Nationality below.)
  • \n
  • Candidates currently residing in Korea (or those who will be living there during the 2021-2022 academic year) will not be considered.  
  • \n
  • Candidates who have already received a PhD degree by the grant start date are not eligible for consideration.
  • \n
"}]},{"name":"Special Application Instructions","id":"special_application_instructions","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

In your Fulbright online application, for Award Name, please select the specific award you are applying for from the drop-down menu. Depending on school availability, ETA awardees may be at a school different from their preferred demographic. ETA applicants should not apply if they are unable to work in a demographic different from their preference. 

\n

All ETAs MUST pay for and receive an apostilled FBI criminal background check before arrival. Criminal background checks are a requirement of employment in schools in Korea.

"},{"name":"Custom Fields","id":"custom_fields","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"Independent Study/Research","value":"

No research or independent study is required for the ETA grant. ETA awards are not study/research awards, and teaching takes up most of the grantee's time. In applying, the Statement of Grant Purpose should focus on why the applicant wishes to teach English in Korea, how being an ETA has some relevance to what they have done so far, what they would like to do in the future, and how to make it a memorable cultural experience. Applicants should understand that they will have little time to intern or volunteer during the school year and any long-standing interests in avenues not related to teaching will need to be partaken of during the summer break period in most cases or after the end of the grant year.

"},{"name":"TESOL/TEFL Certification","value":"

For the 2022-2023 Grant Cycle, KAEC will pay for TESOL/TEFL certification.

\n

All grantees will take an online 120-hour TESOL/TEFL course prior to arriving in Korea in early January in order to meet the Korean government’s requirement. Those already holding certificates/degrees are encouraged to apply and are not required to take the mandated certification course. The Fulbright Commission in Korea will provide TESOL/TEFL certification and coordinate the course logistics after grant acceptance.

"},{"name":"Visa Requirements/Dual Nationality","value":"

Note: The Korean Government utilizes the words “national/nationality” as opposed to “citizen/citizenship” in most official documentation in English. These words can be viewed as interchangeable for the purposes of this advisory.

\n

All Fulbright U.S. Program grantees coming to Korea MUST obtain an A-3 visa and enter the country on a U.S. passport. No other visa status will be accepted.

\n

Candidates who are nationals of Korea will NOT be permitted to undertake Fulbright grants to Korea. 

\n

Individuals of Korean heritage may have dual U.S.-ROK nationality unbeknownst to them or their family.

\n

In April 2010, the Republic of Korea passed legislation that allows dual nationality, with differing rules for men and women. If one of an applicant’s parents is or was a Korean national, the applicant may automatically inherit Korean nationality via Korea’s “jus sanguinis” laws. In order to confirm their Korean nationality status, applicants of Korean heritage MUST contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Korean Consulate PRIOR TO submitting a Fulbright application.

\n

Applicants in the following circumstances are considered by the Republic of Korea to be Korean nationals:

\n
    \n
  • An individual whose father or mother was still a Korean national at the time of the individual’s birth.
  • \n
  • An individual whose father was a Korean national and was deceased at the time of the individual’s birth.
  • \n
\n

Applicants who fall under either of the categories listed above must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Korean Consulate immediately to learn more about these regulations and the suggested procedures for filing for renunciation/loss of Korean nationality.

\n

Applicants who were born in Korea and received American citizenship through naturalization should have lost their Korean nationality automatically at the time of their naturalization. However, official renunciation documentation (국적상실신고) must still be submitted to the Korean Government in order to formalize a citizenship status change. Per the Korean Consulate in Houston, “Failure to formally renounce one’s citizenship after being naturalized in another country may cause issues when applying for visas, marriage or birth registry, and legal matters.” As such, those from Korea naturalized as American citizens must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate to ensure that their loss of Korean nationality has been formally recognized.

\n

Applicants who were born in Korea and received American citizenship through adoption should have lost their Korean nationality automatically six months after American citizenship was granted. However, it has come to KAEC’s attention that Korean nationality renunciation has not always been finalized for adoptees. As such, those adopted from Korea also must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate prior to submitting a Fulbright application to confirm their Korean nationality status.

\n

It is the sole responsibility of the applicant to determine whether they have dual nationality and how it impacts their eligibility for a Fulbright grant. If any individual is found to have dual nationality with Korea at the time of or after grant acceptance, their award offer will be revoked.

\n

In order to avoid cancellation of a Fulbright grant, KAEC requires that all American applicants of Korean heritage provide written proof that they do not have Korean nationality before they accept their grant award. This can be accomplished in two ways, which are listed as follows:

\n
    \n
  1. Submit written proof from the ROK Ministry of Justice declaring that the applicant does not have Korean nationality.\n
      \n
    • Such written proof may take the form of the “basic certificate” (기본증명서), “family relations/register certificate” (가족관계증명서), etc. Documentation must clearly indicate that the applicant does not have Korean nationality in order for it to be accepted as written proof.
    • \n
    \n
  2. \n
  3. Submit a formal document from the ROK Ministry of Justice declaring that the applicant has successfully renounced/lost their Korean nationality.\n
      \n
    • Such documentation may take the form of a “loss of nationality notice” (국적상실 허가 통지서), “renunciation of nationality notice” (국적이탈 허가 통지서), etc.
    • \n
    \n
  4. \n
\n

As an individual’s Korean nationality status is contingent upon specific personal and family history, all applicants of Korean heritage should contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate as early as possible once they have established their interest in the Fulbright Program in Korea in order to confirm their Korean nationality status and acquire appropriate documentation.

\n

More information about Korean nationality law can be found at:

\n"},{"name":"Health Disclosure and Eligibility","value":"

In compliance with the Korean Ministry of Education regulations regarding health and assignment in the school system, candidates must include any medical disclosures for the applicable medical conditions listed below in the medical examination forms provided by IIE and KAEC after being selected as Fulbright finalists. Strict adherence to these regulations is mandatory, and your grant is contingent on the ability to secure a school placement in South Korea. Any attempts to omit or falsify information are immediate grounds for suspending/revoking/terminating the grant. 

\n

Individuals with the following conditions cannot be placed in Korean classrooms:

\n
    \n
  • Visual impairments (conditions that cannot be corrected by glasses/contact lenses)
  • \n
  • Hearing impairments above 40dB
  • \n
\n

In addition, selectees must also disclose the following conditions in their medical forms: 

\n
    \n
  1. Conditions worsened by stress such as: epilepsy, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, etc.
  2. \n
  3. Severe food allergies including, but not limited to: nuts, shellfish, and beans
  4. \n
\n

All teachers in Korea must undergo routine drug testing and medical health checks before and during employment. As such, ETAs must also pay for and receive a drug test and undergo a health check before they are allowed to come to Korea. They must submit all examination results, including tuberculosis testing results, on the Fulbright medical form. This testing is REQUIRED for all candidates who are awarded grants.

\n

A few grantees may be required by their local Board of Education or school to undergo a second health check in Korea to ensure that the ETA’s health is up to the local health employment standards. Regardless, all applicants who accept an ETA grant must undergo a health exam and drug test in the USA before departing for Korea.

\n

Additional Note on Prescription Medication: Applicants with ongoing medical or health issues that need specific prescription medication should keep in mind that while Korea is an advanced country with world-renowned medical facilities, ETAs may be placed in rural settings where access to large medical centers or specific medications is not as prevalent.

\n

Certain prescription drugs are considered controlled substances and subject to the regulations established by the Korean Food and Drug Administration and the Korean Customs Service. While most medication in the USA can be found in Korea, some medication that is available in the USA is not approved in Korea. Applicants who anticipate needing to manage a condition with certain medications should consult their doctor and make informed decisions before applying for or accepting a grant.

\n

Applicants who need prescription medication should also consult the US Embassy in Seoul’s American Citizen’s Service webpage regarding medical assistance AND the Republic of Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (KFDA).

"}]},{"name":"Dependents","id":"dependents","type":"options","value":["Dependent support is not available"]},{"name":"Placement Locations","id":"placement_locations","type":"multitype","value":[{"type":"options","value":["Rural"]},{"type":"text","value":"

In addition, ETAs also will be placed in regional cities.

\n

Applicants should not expect to be placed in or around major metropolitan areas; first-year ETA grantees will not be placed in Seoul. ETAs should be open to teaching at any placement with the understanding that the Fulbright Korea program wishes to reach more underserved populations outside of metropolitan areas.

"}]},{"name":"Fulbright Program Management Contact","id":"pm_contact","type":"text","value":"FBstudent.EAP@iie.org"},{"name":"Fulbright Commission/U.S. Embassy Website","id":"embassy_website","type":"link","value":"http://www.fulbright.or.kr"},{"name":"Fulbright Commission/U.S. Embassy Contact","id":"embassy_contact","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"Isabel Moua","value":"eta@fulbright.or.kr "}]},{"name":"Additional Online Resources","id":"resources","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"ROK Embassies and Consulates in the USA ","value":"http://overseas.mofa.go.kr/us-en/index.do"},{"name":"US Embassy and Consulate in South Korea","value":"https://kr.usembassy.gov/"},{"name":"US State Department Country Travel Information ","value":"https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/International-Travel-Country-Information-Pages/SouthKorea.html"}]},{"name":"Is new for this year","id":"is_new","type":"checkbox","value":false}]} [is_new] => 0 [step] => 6 [status] => 1 [updated_on] => 2021-05-03 15:53:22 [finalized_date] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00 [countryName] => South Korea [regionId] => 20 [countryCode] => KR [countryAlias] => south-korea [regionName] => East Asia-Pacific [regionAlias] => east-asia-pacific [regionColor] => #c16339 [regionPosition] => a:3:{i:0;d:2.2;i:1;i:110;i:2;d:4.25;} [regionBgColor] => #ff8200 [regionBgHoverColor] => #dc4405 )
20
English Teaching Assistant Award - Elementary
stdClass Object ( [id] => 400 [country_id] => 66 [grant_type_id] => 9 [number_of_grants] => 2 [title] => Korean Studies Graduate Degree Award [content] => {"fields":[{"name":"Specialized Grant Types","id":"specialized_grant_types","type":"options","visibility":2,"value":[]},{"name":"Fulbright Graduate Degree Grants","id":"fulbright_graduate_degree_grants","type":"checkbox","visibility":2,"value":true},{"name":"CLEA Availability","id":"clea_availability","type":"checkbox","visibility":2,"value":false},{"name":"Award Profile","id":"award_profile","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

Korean Studies Graduate Degree Awards provide up to two years of financial support to academically mature students pursuing a graduate degree (Master's or PhD) in Korean Studies at a Korean university. The objective of the award is to promote the growth of Korean Studies as a field in the United States. As such, awards support individuals who intend to pursue Korean Studies as an aspect of their career and thus wish to complete an advanced degree focused primarily on Korea. 

\n

Graduate students in Korea are expected to study and conduct research on a full-time basis, while maintaining satisfactory academic progress. 

\n

Award candidates must apply for and receive admission to a Korean Studies graduate degree program independently. Final issuance of the award is contingent upon independent acceptance into an eligible Korean Studies graduate degree program.

"},{"name":"Grant Period","id":"grant_period","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Flexible Start","value":"

Grant support is for two academic years. However, renewal for the second year is dependent upon the grantee achieving academic success (above a 3.0/4.0 GPA or equivalent) during the first year.

\n

The Korean academic year typically begins in March. Thus, most grantees are anticipated to begin their grants in the February following grant award notification. However, should the proposed university program offer a fall start date, grantees may be able to start during the fall following grant award notification. 

\n

Grants will begin:

\n

-Late Summer/Early Fall 2022

\n

or

\n

-Late Winter/Early Spring 2023

\n

Grant program end dates will coincide with the selected graduate program's final exam schedule.

"}},{"name":"Orientation","id":"orientation","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Pre-Departure Orientation","value":"

A virtual pre-departure orientation session will be offered by the Commission during the spring/summer of 2022 prior to grantee arrival in Korea.

\n

Grantees are also expected to attend any in-country orientation programming required by their host university. 

"}},{"name":"Candidate Profile","id":"candidate_profile","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

The Korean Studies Graduate Degree Program aims to prepare the next generation of Korean Studies faculty for American universities and Korean specialists for the public and private sectors. As such, only candidates who express a specific intent to pursue Korean Studies as an aspect of their career will be considered. All candidates must explain their interest in Korean Studies in the Statement of Grant Purpose. They must also describe how earning a Korean Studies graduate degree will contribute to their future career path.

"},{"name":"Accepted Degree Levels","id":"accepted_degree_levels","type":"options","visibility":1,"value":["Bachelor's","Master's","Doctoral"]},{"name":"Supplementary Project","id":"supplementary_project","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"","value":""}},{"name":"Foreign Language Proficiency","id":"foreign_language_proficiency","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Required - Intermediate","value":"

Candidates with advanced levels of Korean language ability will be given preference. Applicants must show evidence of Korean language ability by:

\n
    \n
  1. Providing transcripts containing at least 5 semesters of Korean language coursework; OR
  2. \n
  3. Providing TOPIK test results demonstrating Level 3 or higher proficiency; OR
  4. \n
  5. Providing LTI Korean test results in reading, writing, and listening demonstrating a Level B1 or higher proficiency in each skill.
  6. \n
\n

Candidates will be asked to provide supporting documentation to the Commission at the semi-finalist stage in February 2022.

\n

Language proficiency requirements are also contingent on the graduate degree program selected. As such, candidates should additionally reference the requirements of the degree program in which they intend to enroll.

\n

For information regarding the TOPIK (Test of Proficiency in Korean), visit www.topik.go.kr.

\n

For information regarding LTI (Language Testing International) Korean tests, visit www.languagetesting.com. LTI is a licensee of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Test results from LTI should be reported according to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), which utilizes an A1 to C2 scale.

"}},{"name":"Critical Language Enhancement Award","id":"critical_language_enhancement_award","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":""},{"name":"Fulbright Proposal Types","id":"fulbright_proposal_types","type":"options_array","visibility":1,"value":[{"name":"Independent Study/Research","id":"isr","value":"No"},{"name":"Graduate Degree Enrollment","id":"gde","value":"Yes"}]},{"name":"Affiliation","id":"affiliation","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"No affiliation letter required","value":"

No affiliation letter is required at the time of the application deadline. However, candidates must indicate within their application in which graduate program they intend to enroll. Candidates must apply for and receive admission to a Korean Studies graduate degree program independently. Final issuance of the award is contingent upon independent acceptance into an eligible Korean Studies graduate degree program.

"}},{"name":"Affiliation Fees/Tuition","id":"affiliation_fees","type":"pair","visibility":1,"value":{"name":"Tuition covered in grant benefits","value":"

Award recipients will recieve up to $15,000 of tuition support each academic year (distributed in KRW). Award recipients will also receive a one-time book & research allowance as well as a monthly living stipend and housing stipend (if housing is not provided by Fulbright Korea).

"}},{"name":"Housing Arrangements","id":"housing_arrangements","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":""},{"name":"Placement Type","id":"placement_type","type":"multitype","visibility":1,"value":[{"type":"options","value":[]},{"type":"text","value":""}]},{"name":"Eligibility","id":"eligibility","type":"multitype","visibility":1,"value":[{"type":"options_array","value":[{"name":"","id":"f_eligibility_01","value":"Dual citizens of this country are not eligible"},{"name":"","id":"f_eligibility_02","value":"Residency in host country not permitted in year prior to grant"}]},{"type":"text","value":"
    \n
  • Candidates with dual U.S.-Republic of Korea nationality/citizenship will not be considered. (See section on Visa Requirements/Dual Nationality below.)
  • \n
  • Candidates currently residing in Korea (or those who will be living there during the 2021-2022 academic year) will not be considered.  
  • \n
  • Candidates who have already received a PhD degree by the grant start date are not eligible for consideration.
  • \n
"}]},{"name":"Special Application Instructions","id":"special_application_instructions","type":"text","visibility":1,"value":"

Applicants must select \"Korean Studies Grad\" in the Award Name field of the application.

"},{"name":"Custom Fields","id":"custom_fields","type":"custom","value":[{"name":"Visa Requirements/Dual Nationality","value":"

Note: The Korean Government utilizes the words “national/nationality” as opposed to “citizen/citizenship” in most official documentation in English. These words can be viewed as interchangeable for the purposes of this advisory.

\n

All Fulbright U.S. Program grantees coming to Korea MUST obtain an A-3 visa and enter the country on a U.S. passport. No other visa status will be accepted.

\n

Candidates who are nationals of Korea will NOT be permitted to undertake Fulbright grants to Korea. 

\n

Individuals of Korean heritage may have dual U.S.-ROK nationality unbeknownst to them or their family.

\n

In April 2010, the Republic of Korea passed legislation that allows dual nationality, with differing rules for men and women. If one of an applicant’s parents is or was a Korean national, the applicant may automatically inherit Korean nationality via Korea’s “jus sanguinis” laws. In order to confirm their Korean nationality status, applicants of Korean heritage MUST contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Korean Consulate PRIOR TO submitting a Fulbright application.

\n

Applicants in the following circumstances are considered by the Republic of Korea to be Korean nationals:

\n
    \n
  • An individual whose father or mother was still a Korean national at the time of the individual’s birth.
  • \n
  • An individual whose father was a Korean national and was deceased at the time of the individual’s birth.
  • \n
\n

Applicants who fall under either of the categories listed above must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Korean Consulate immediately to learn more about these regulations and the suggested procedures for filing for renunciation/loss of Korean nationality.

\n

Applicants who were born in Korea and received American citizenship through naturalization should have lost their Korean nationality automatically at the time of their naturalization. However, official renunciation documentation (국적상실신고) must still be submitted to the Korean Government in order to formalize a citizenship status change. Per the Korean Consulate in Houston, “Failure to formally renounce one’s citizenship after being naturalized in another country may cause issues when applying for visas, marriage or birth registry, and legal matters.” As such, those from Korea naturalized as American citizens must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate to ensure that their loss of Korean nationality has been formally recognized.

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Applicants who were born in Korea and received American citizenship through adoption should have lost their Korean nationality automatically six months after American citizenship was granted. However, it has come to KAEC’s attention that Korean nationality renunciation has not always been finalized for adoptees. As such, those adopted from Korea also must contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate prior to submitting a Fulbright application to confirm their Korean nationality status.

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It is the sole responsibility of the applicant to determine whether they have dual nationality and how it impacts their eligibility for a Fulbright grant. If any individual is found to have dual nationality with Korea at the time of or after grant acceptance, their award offer will be revoked.

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In order to avoid cancellation of a Fulbright grant, KAEC requires that all American applicants of Korean heritage provide written proof that they do not have Korean nationality before they accept their grant award. This can be accomplished in two ways, which are listed as follows:

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  1. Submit written proof from the ROK Ministry of Justice declaring that the applicant does not have Korean nationality.\n
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    • Such written proof may take the form of the “basic certificate” (기본증명서), “family relations/register certificate” (가족관계증명서), etc. Documentation must clearly indicate that the applicant does not have Korean nationality in order for it to be accepted as written proof.
    • \n
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  2. \n
  3. Submit a formal document from the ROK Ministry of Justice declaring that the applicant has successfully renounced/lost their Korean nationality.\n
      \n
    • Such documentation may take the form of a “loss of nationality notice” (국적상실 허가 통지서), “renunciation of nationality notice” (국적이탈 허가 통지서), etc.
    • \n
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  4. \n
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As an individual’s Korean nationality status is contingent upon specific personal and family history, all applicants of Korean heritage should contact the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate as early as possible once they have established their interest in the Fulbright Program in Korea in order to confirm their Korean nationality status and acquire appropriate documentation.

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More information about Korean nationality law can be found at:

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2
Korean Studies Graduate Degree Award NEW